Jim Dine

Have a Heart

February 1 – April 11, 2014

JD - The March Towards Alder

The March Towards Alder, 2011

Acrylic, charcoal and sand on linen

48 x 42 inches

Jim Dine_Racing Heart, 2012 (48" x 36") Framed - Casterline|Goodman Gallery

French-Canadian Racing Heart, 2012

Acrylic, charcoal and sand on canvas

48 x 36 inches

Jim Dine: Have a Heart: February 1, 2014 – April 11, 2014

Jim Dine is one of the last living pop artists and is known for painting hearts, palettes, robes, and Pinocchio. Despite being associated with the Pop Art movement, Dine prefers to be recognized for his gestural approach, Dada assemblage, and collage techniques. In Casterline|Goodman’s show of heart paintings, Dine has approached the canvas with a hands-on, expressive style that any viewer would be moved by.

 

When interviewed about his heart series, Dine said, “I use them as a template for all my emotions.” It is part of Dine’s method to work through a theme in many different mediums. Through sculpture, painting, prints, and drawings, Dine personally investigates his themes, which are sometimes simply lost or overlooked in everyday life. Dine once stated, “The figure is still the only thing I have faith in in terms of how much emotion it’s charged with and how much subject matter is there.”

Dine rose to the art scene in the 1960s with Claes Oldenburg and Allan Kaprow exhibiting “Happenings”. He was also part of one of the first Pop Art shows in America called New Painting of Common Objects, which was held at the Norton Simon Museum, and featured other artists such as Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, and Roy Lichtenstein. As Dine continued his career in New York, he turned to painting and gave his pieces a personal touch by placing items such as clothing, shoes, and tools on his canvases. Dine finds inspiration through his memories and paints objects that have a strong intimate meaning and a sense of identity.

 

Jim Dine is internationally known and has work in the permanent collections of many museums including the Guggenheim Museum,
The Whitney Museum of American Art, Jewish Museum in New York, National Gallery in Washington, DC,
Boston Museum of Fine Art,
Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, New York,
Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City,
Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago,
Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville,
and Museo di arte moderna e contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto in Italy.