Flower Power

June 21 – July 31, 2013

Donald Baechler_Red+Blue Rose, 2011 (72" x 48") - Casterline|Goodman

Red + Blue Rose, 2011

Acrylic and fabric collage on canvas

72 x 48 inches

Donald Baechler-Yellow Rose-2009_Goodman|Casterline

Yellow Rose, 2009

Gesso, flashe and paper collage on paper

52 x 40 inches, 57 x 45 ¼ inches framed

Alex Katz_Lily 1, 1967 (14" x 18") Framed - Casterline|Goodman Gallery

Lily 1, 1967

Oil on board

14 x 18 inches

(35.6 x 45.7 cm)

Signed and dated on verso

Alex Katz_Red Roses, 1966 (14 1/8" x 14 1/8") Framed - Casterline|Goodman Gallery

Red Roses, 1966

Oil on canvas

14 1/8 x 14 1/8 inches

(35.9 x 35.9 cm)

Signed and dated on front

C|G - Alex Katz_Pink Petunia #2, 1968 (18" x 32")

Pink Petunia #2, 1968

Oil on canvas

18 x 32 inches

Alex Katz_Tiger Lily, 1968 (31.7" x 48.7") Framed - Casterline|Goodman Gallery

Tiger Lily, 1968

Oil on canvas

31.7 x 48.7 inches

Signed and dated 68

Bourgeois_Les Fleurs, 2009 (23.5" x 18")

Les Fleurs, 2009

Gouache on paper

23 ½ x 18 inches (26 ¾ x 21 1/8 inches)

(BOUR-13877)

Initialed on recto, lower right: LB

Inscribed on verso: Les Fleurs

Donald Baechler_Red Rose, 2012 (52" x 40") - Casterline|Goodman

Rose, 2012

Gesso, flashe and paper collage on paper

52 x 40 inches, 57 x 45 ¼ inches framed

DB.5056

Donald Baechler_Rose with Spoons, 2012 (52" x 40") - Casterline|Goodman

Rose with Spoons, 2012

Gesso, flashe and paper collage on paper

52 x 40 inches, 57 x 45 ¼ inches framed

DB.5048

Wesselmann_Birthday Bouquet

Birthday Bouquet, 1988-1991

Sculpture (laser cut steel with enamel)

42 1/2 x 54 1/3 inches

Flowers, 1964

Synthetic polymer and silkscreen ink on canvas

8 x 8 inches

Signed and dated on reverse

Stamped on reverse by Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board, #A113.984

Catalogue raisonee #1713

Jeff Koons_Flower Drawing, 2011 - Casterline|Goodman Gallery

Flower Drawing (Green), 2011

Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating

30 x 30 inches

Signed with the artist’s initials and numbered ‘JK 1/13’ (on the reverse)

Edition of 13, plus 2 APs

Donald Sultan_Acqua with Black, 2009 (48" x 48") - Casterline|Goodman

Acqua with Black, August 20, 2009

Oil paint, spackle, and tar on tile over masonite

48 x 48 x 4 inches

Flower Power: June 21, 2013 – July 31, 2013

Casterline|Goodman Gallery is proud to present Flower Power, showing selections from Donald Baechler, Louise Bourgeois, Alex Katz, Jeff Koons, Marc Quinn, Donald Sultan, Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselmann. The show will run from June 21 to July 31, 2013.

 

The study and fascination with flowers and plants is a global phenomenon. Floral patterns have been used since ancient times, as medicine books in medieval times, in still lifes during the Renaissance, and to decorate yards, ceramics, glass, jewelry, and textiles today. Casterline|Goodman presents a collection of artists that have been famed for their floral series and their unique approach to the matured subject matter.

 

Andy Warhol is famous for a number of series, but his Flowers series had an immediate impact on his viewers. Warhol had just completed his Death and Disaster series and with the advise of Henry Geldzahler, the curator of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, took a radically different route by photographing hibiscus flowers. Inspired by his photographs, Warhol created his Flower series from 1964-1965, during the height of his popularity. The bright colors and pure, fragile subject matter had a cheerful effect, which was a necessary contrast to his previous collection of car crashes and suicides. He flattened the flower and the background by blocking them in color and added a cropped square composition with a frontal viewpoint. As Warhol had done with past pop art series, he used silkscreening to mass-produce the bright colored images and then hung them, which created a rhythmic effect across the wall. 

 

Donald Baechler, a contemporary artist known for his child-like paintings and sculptures, was also inspired from photographs. He collected them over his lifetime; yet, out of a couple hundred photos, he only uses one or two. Baechler says, “It's necessary to accumulate all of these things to get to the point of what's important." Like Warhol’s Flowers, Baechler’s bright flower compositions have had a cheerful, calming affect on his audience. Steven Vincent in Art in America wrote on Baechler by stating, "Like Art Brut, Donald Baechler's seemingly ingenuous depictions of everyday objects and simple figures succeed in large part by tapping into our Nostalgia for childhood, that period of life before the riveting onset of self-consciousness and guilt.” Casterline|Goodman is showing Baechler’s Yellow Rose, Rose, and Rose with Spoons, which display a large central flower with a collaged background inspired from his photographs.

 

Alex Katz is a painter known for his portraiture, but began painting from nature while he studied at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine. Every year following, Katz would travel from his loft in SoHo to his 19th century farmhouse in Maine to work.  Katz was inspired by the freedom and spontaneity of nature as well as Jackson Pollock’s use of space, which lead him to paint a series of all-over tree paintings. After his retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1986, he gave his full attention to the environmental flower and landscape paintings. Casterline|Goodman has put together an impressive collection of his flowers and landscapes over the past decade featuring Katz’s Tan Woods, Tiger Lily, Red Roses, Lily 1, and Pink Petunia #2

Jeff Koons is currently the highest paid living artist since the sale of his Balloon Dog (Orange) in 2013 for $58.4 million. He is best known for his pop art sculptures consisting of likable subjects such as puppies, hearts, toys, flowers, and play-doh. His works have no hidden meaning, but are appealing because of his bold, clean cut, and glamorous style. Koons work stems from his understanding of advertisement and the media, which has won critics over to deem his creations “high art icons”. One of his most recent flower works was his Split-Rocker installation, which is a thirty-seven foot topiary in front of the Rockefeller Center in New York City. From Casterline|Goodman’s collection, Koon’s Flower Drawing (Green), a polished stainless steel mirror, will be on show. 

 

Marc Quinn is part of the Young British Artists group and is famous for his sculptures that deal with the ‘natural’ and ‘cultural’ in relation to the human psyche. In 2007, he started working with flowers in which he created a hyperrealist and frozen series. Quinn has stated, “The fact that these flowers are always available to us is artificial and unnatural. The other side to these works is that they are a celebration of color, life, and sensuality. I always buy my flowers myself and arrange them as though I were creating a sculpture.” On display is Quinn’s The Waves Become Snow flower painting, which is part of his Hyperrealist series.

 

Donald Sultan is an American artist known for his large-scale still life paintings made out of industrial materials such as vinyl, linoleum, and masonite, tar, rubber, and paint. His flower series is abstracted and color blocked, yet his manipulation of industrial materials creates a painterly effect, and the expanses of tar besides the monochromatic flower make the subject equal to its negative space. Sultan’s use of color has been compared to Andy Warhol’s work, which achieves a similar effect through silkscreening. Casterline|Goodman’s Acqua with Black is a beautiful example of his bold, abstracted simplicity.

 

Andy Warhol is famous for a number of series, but his Flowers series had an immediate impact on his viewers. Warhol had just completed his Death and Disaster series and with the advise of Henry Geldzahler, the curator of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, took a radically different route by photographing hibiscus flowers. Inspired by his photographs, Warhol created his Flower series from 1964-1965, during the height of his popularity. The bright colors and pure, fragile subject matter had a cheerful effect, which was a necessary contrast to his previous collection of car crashes and suicides. He flattened the flower and the background by blocking them in color and added a cropped square composition with a frontal viewpoint. As Warhol had done with past pop art series, he used silkscreening to mass-produce the bright colored images and then hung them, which created a rhythmic affect across the wall.

 

Tom Wessellmann is known as one of the leading pop artist of the 1960s. Wessellmann worked through assemblage, which juxtaposes and collages images. He has created a series of still lives, nude women, and smokers, which are usually charged with sexual overtones. Wessellmann’s still lives are comprised of household objects and flowers in interior or exterior settings made mostly of magazine cut-outs. Casterline|Goodman is showing a rare example of his laser cut steel and enamel still life Birthday Bouquet. Although his still lives seem to fit in the realm of pop art, Wessellmann’s goal is to exhibit the objects beauty instead of critic consumerist culture.